T H E PA R A B L E O F T H E
T I N Y S E E D
F. Wayne Mac Leod
Illustrated by:
Ranald E. A. Schuey
Light To My Path Book Distribution
Copyright © 2009 F. Wayne Mac Leod
All rights reserved.
No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written
permission of the author.
I
THE PARABLE
OF THE TINY SEED
saw in my dream a tiny seed. Why my mind would ever focus its
attention upon such a small and insignificant object was beyond me.
For some reason, however, I was captivated by this little object. As I
took a closer look, I noticed nothing particular. To all appearances it was a
simple, ordinary seed.
In my dream, however, I heard a small frail, nervous type of voice, barely
audible at first. As my ears began to adjust themselves, I discovered the
source of the sound. It was the seed itself. My interest grew. I strained to
hear exactly what he was saying. What a sad tale he told. He was all alone.
A lonely apple seed cast aside by a passerby, who considered him not
worthy of keeping. There he lay, alone in the grass, unnoticed by anyone
but me, with a very bleak future indeed. "For what chance," he said," has a
lonely, insignificant seed to survive the scorching heat of summer, and the
constant caravan of birds in search of breakfast." Oh how he wept. How
downcast he was. He had given up all hope in life.
As I listened, I heard him say, "Why did God make me like this? Why did I
have to be born a silly seed? Why, I could think of a hundred things I would
rather be. A bird, for example, how beautiful and graceful they are as they
soar carefree in the sky, exploring here and there, diving and gliding with
the greatest of ease. What ability they have. Oh, to be a creature like that
would be so exciting. Or how about an ant, busy, intelligent, and creative,
making their own homes and carrying objects many times their own weight.
"Oh," he cried, (this time uncontrollably), "here I am a silly seed with no
such ability or intelligence, doomed to be picked up by some animal and
eaten, or to remain here and shrivel up in the sun." I found myself feeling
sorry for the little seed. What a desperate situation. How terrible he must
have felt. Yet I could do nothing to help him. I continued to watch,
however, to see what might happen to him. Days went by and nothing
seemed to change. The little seed lay there motionless, ever weeping, with
no hope.
One day the Master, himself, passed by and noticed the small seed
lying in the grass. How He would notice such a small seed I have
never been able to understand, but what struck me even more was
how He stooped down to look at it. As I looked at the Master, I noticed a
tear forming in His eye. What compassion, I thought. As I watched, I heard
the Master speak. "Little seed," He said, "why do you weep?"
The little seed, with his feeble voice responded, "Oh Master, why do you
waste your time talking to me. I am nothing. I have no ability. I do not have
the intelligence of the ant. I cannot soar in the sky like the bird. I am
doomed to lie here until someone comes and eats me, or the sun shrivels me
up."
With His eyes now full of tears, the Master, Himself weeping, spoke to the
little seed. "Little seed," He said, "I have a use for you. If you will allow
me, I can do many great things through you, but you must obey me and be
able to endure much suffering."
"Oh," cried the seed, "I do not know how You could you ever use me but
Master, may Your will be done." "Very well," said the Master, and with that
A
He picked up that little seed and carried him away.
s I watched, I saw the Master, with great care and concern, take
the little seed with Him to a green pasture, one of the most
beautiful I have ever seen. After several minutes of looking here
and there, the Master headed for the middle of the pasture, where there was
a beautiful river. After sitting on a rock beside the river, the Master looked
down to the little seed that had been securely kept in the warmth of His
hand. "Little seed," He said, "this will be your new home."
"It is indeed a most beautiful place," replied the little seed. "How can I ever
repay You for the love You have shown me this day?"
"I will know you love me in return," said the Master "if you obey Me and
are faithful to the end. This will mean many struggles. Are you willing to
face these for me?"
"You have already blessed me with more than I could ever have imagined
by your kindness and love. How could I refuse to obey You to the end,"
answered the little seed?